This Page Is Out of Date

It appears that your browser settings are preventing this page from loading the latest version. You may be seeing old information or you may run into errors because of this. Your system time settings can also cause this issue. Please check that your system time is correct.

Dismiss Tell Me More

EstateSales.NET Blog

Listed below are various articles about estate sales, estate sale companies, and our office that we hope you find interesting. If you have any questions regarding the content on our blog, please feel free to give us a call or e-mail us. We answer the phones between 7am and 11pm Central time 7 days a week.

1-10 of 95

Using the Map Slider

Among the many features we rolled out on our recently-revamped search page is a new, customizable map. With a flick of your wrist, you can easily tailor your map view to suit your needs, showing sales as close as 5 miles from your location, or as far as 100 miles, using a simple slider bar. Check it out. When you search EstateSales.NET by zip code or by city, you’ll see a map of the area, with a “distance circle” surrounding it. Within that circle, you’ll see markers for every estate sale and auction listed on our site, within a certain distance. Beneath the map, you’ll find several toggle buttons that can limit the type of sales you see, and a slider bar that will home in on a specific location or expand your search area. Move the slider bar to the right, and the circle will grow, and we'll show you—both on the map and in the sale listings—estate sales within a greater distance from where you are, up to 100 miles. Feel like keeping your search closer to home? Move the bar to the left...

Sale Listing Update

You may have noticed a few changes over on the EstateSales.NET city pages. We’ve been working hard to improve the overall experience and make it easier than ever to shop estate sales near you. So now, when you search EstateSales.NET for sales in a specific area, things might seem a bit different. So, what’s new? It’s bigger. I think we can all agree that one of the best things about checking out estate sales online ahead of time is flipping through photos of all the great items that will be available when the sale begins. Shopping trips are planned based on those photos. In a picture of assorted kitchenware, you can see the Pyrex 444 Friendship bowl—the one you need to complete your set. When the doors open, you know to make a beeline to the kitchen, to the counter to the left of the sink, next to a stack of Corelle plates like your grandmother had. It’s clearly waiting just for you. Maybe those plates are, too. But you can decide that later. Bigger pictures mean more dreaming, less squinting, and better overall planning...

Estate Sale Collectibles: Starting Small

It’s easy to become enamored with the items you find at estate sales. It’s also easy to find yourself ready to spend far more than you were planning. Buyer's remorse? Never. But it is a little disappointing to open your wallet and see tiny moths flutter out of it like in the cartoons because you just bought a carload of fantastic stuff. It’s hard. We understand. But for those looking to liven up your life and shelfspace with some new collectibles, there are plenty of doodads for shoppers on a budget, with a variety to enjoy and a history to dive into. I’ve started many of my own budding collections based on the affordability of these and other irresistible estate sale items. Salt & Pepper Shakers A post shared by Robin's_Lane (@robinslane) on Jan 17, 2018 at 2:05pm PST Not only cookie cutters , but many vintage kitchen utensils can be found at an estate sales for just a few dollars...

Collecting Sad-Irons

We are fortunate to live in a time of perennially wrinkle-free clothing. When I was a child, my mother used to drag her iron and ironing board into the living room to iron my father’s dress shirts and pants every week. I assumed that I, too, would need to learn this skill, because as a dutiful wife, I would need to iron my husband’s suits each week. But that didn’t end up being the case. Thanks, permanent-press clothing, feminism, and the business-casual workplace! But while my mother’s ironing chores seemed arduous and I’m glad I managed to avoid them, they were far less difficult than the work of the mothers that came before either of us, in the long, long ago. Before the electric iron, the pressing process was much more difficult, and much...warmer. A post shared by Everything Old Canada (@everythingoldcanada) on Feb 22, 2017 at 7:02pm PST A technological improvement over charcoal, irons heated by liquid fuel—kerosene, denatured alcohol, and gasoline—produced less smoke, and could be temperature regulated...

Collecting Trivets

It took all the strength I had not to title this article “The Trouble with Trivets,” purely for the sake of busting out an old school Star Trek reference and, at the same time, making a terrible pun. But there’s no correlation between the two things—the Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles" and vintage metal trivets—that I’m aware of. Just know that, for a moment, I was very, very clever. Because the fact of the matter is, there is no trouble with trivets . These footed stands, traditionally made of metal, most often cast iron, allow hot kettles and pans to be placed on a tabletop without ruining the finish. See? No trouble at all! But trivets are more than just hardcore potholders. There’s beautiful history and craftsmanship involved. The traditional triangular design was intended to hold hot laundry irons fresh out of the wood-burning stove. And their intricate designs—scrolls, leaves and hearts for days—were the sign of the artistry of centuries of metalworkers. Collecting can start innocently enough...

Name that Glassware!

Are you a Professor of Pyrex? The Queen of Fire-King? The Titan of Hazel Atlas? The President of Federal? A...really knowledgeable person in regards to Glasbake? Prove it. Searching For a Company Looking for a company to conduct your sale? Go to our Hire a Company page to find a company in your area. Find a Company Get Notified Sign up to receive free email notifications of estate sales in your area! Subscribe Now ...

DIY: Costume Jewelry Tree

If I had a Christmas tree, I would light it with vintage bubble lights, just like the ones we had as kids, when my siblings and I would race them to see whose light would start bubbling first. Then, I would hang ornaments from the box my mother started when I was born—the one she added to each year so when I moved out, I would already have meaningful ornaments for my tree. Isn’t that precious? But I don’t have a Christmas tree, because I have pets that can't be trusted. A giant dog who doesn't know his own size, and a cat whose personal mission in life to destroy everything I love. (That's right, Seamus. I'm onto you.) So instead I’ve put together a festive holiday topiary that acts as an homage to the vintage baubles I long for from Christmases past. And there’s no tedious clean-up afterwards. And my pets can’t reach it. And it’s all possible thanks to—you guessed it—estate sales. This year, I’m classing up my home and the holidays with a costume jewelry tree...

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2017

We just wanted to take a moment and specifically wish the estate sale companies on our site a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Many of us are taking off to spend time with family and to reflect on the past year. There are now over 10,000 estate sale companies on EstateSales.NET. You all are amazing. We hear over and over again about how professionals like yourselves handle very emotional situations with grace and poise. We made a quick video to highlight your accomplishments. I'm not sure how "Flubber of Words" got put on my title, but I think it was earned. ;) ...

Collecting Lionel Trains

Header photo courtesy of Pace & Hong Auctions Trains are an undeniable emblem of the holiday season. From tracks laid ‘round the base of a tree, to the popular book The Polar Express , the chug of the engine and that unmistakable whistle indicate a shipment of halcyon memories of Christmases past pulling into the station. And it was all engineered by one man with a great idea. Joshua Lionel Cowen (born Cohen), a businessman, inventor, and marketer, convinced toy store owners that model trains would be the perfect addition to their store windows. America's fascination with railroads, combined with the train's main job of delivering goods (i.e. toys and gifts) made the department store display the perfect medium for Cowen's playful industrial art. Though they were initially intended for display only, shoppers very quickly caught on that electric trains would make great gifts, and soon enough a tradition was born. Cowen knew he had something special on his hands, and he built a century-spanning business on the wonder of railroad technology...

Collecting Vintage Buttons

I bought a Mason jar full of buttons from an estate sale over a decade ago. I don’t know why. Mason jars were not yet the “thing” they so clearly are today, and I had absolutely no use for the buttons themselves. I didn’t sew. Or craft. Or even wear a lot of clothing that utilized buttons. But I was drawn to them. The jar. The colors. The possibilities. So I bought them, and set them on a shelf where they sat quietly, bringing me joy with their mere existence. Occasionally I would add to it if I came across a small lot at a sale, but mostly the jar collected dust on a shelf next to an equally-dusty Christmas cactus, ignored but not unloved. According to Jerry DeHay, a longtime collector and board member of the National Button Society , I am a “closet collector.” This, he said, is how many button collections begin. Not with a bang, but a shrug. His wife, too, was a closet collector for years before finally coming out, buttons in tow, ready to learn more about these tiny treasures. And eventually, she pulled him into the fold as well...

1-10 of 95